Treating Testicular Cancer

The information and services provided by the Center for Advocacy for Cancer of the Testes International (CACTI) are for informational purposes only. The information and services are not intended to be substitutes for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. If you are ill, or suspect that you are ill, seek professional medical attention immediately. CACTI does not recommend or endorse any specific physicians, treatments, procedures or products, even though they may be mentioned on this site.


Making treatment decisions.

In recent years, a lot of progress has been made in treating testicular cancer. Surgical methods have been refined, and doctors know more about the best ways to use chemotherapy and radiation to treat different types of testicular cancer.

After the cancer is diagnosed and staged, your cancer care team will discuss treatment options with you. Depending on the type and stage of the cancer and other factors, treatment options for testicular cancer can include:

In some cases, more than one of type of treatment might be used.

You may have different types of doctors on your treatment team, depending on the stage of your cancer and your treatment options. These doctors may include:

  • A urologist: a surgeon who specializes in treating diseases of the urinary system and male reproductive system
  • A radiation oncologist: a doctor who treats cancer with radiation therapy
  • A medical oncologist: a doctor who treats cancer with medicines such as chemotherapy

Many other specialists might be involved in your care as well, including physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, physical therapists, social workers, and other health professionals. (See Health Professionals Associated With Cancer Care for more on this.)

It’s important to discuss all of your treatment options as well as their possible side effects with your doctors to help make the decision that best fits your needs. (See the section “What should you ask your doctor about testicular cancer?” for some questions to ask.)

When time permits, getting a second opinion is often a good idea. It can give you more information and help you feel good about the treatment plan you choose.

Where you are treated is important. There is no substitute for experience. You have the best chance for a good outcome if you go to a hospital that treats many testicular cancer patients.

Last Medical Review: 01/20/2015
Last Revised: 02/13/2015
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